Reading Stack

I feel like my reading material has been all over the map lately. I’m digging deeeeeeep into the Gospel of John right now and hope to write some thoughts on that soon.  Until then, here are a few links that have caught my eye.

  • BioLogos has released “A Christian Statement on Science for Pandemic Times.” The statement is signed by dozens of Christian leaders, calling on Christians to follow the advice of public health experts and support scientists doing crucial biomedical research on COVID-19. CLICK HERE to read and sign the statement.

  • We continue to learn more and more about the coronavirus that oftentimes leaves young survivors with lingering health issues. Read the story of the first COVID-19, double lung transplant patient in the U.S.:  A 28-year-old paralegal and member of the Latino community, one of the groups disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. 

  • “The 19th Amendment, ratified a century ago on Aug. 18, 1920, is often hailed for granting American women the right to vote. And yet most Black women would wait nearly five decades more to actually exercise that right.” Read “‘It’s a Struggle They Will Wage Alone.’ How Black Women Won the Right to Vote,” published in Time Magazine, to better understand how laws don’t always immediately guarantee rights – especially for those who have been socially disenfranchised.

  • Greenville University (Illinois) theology professor Benjamin Wayman sat down with Rowan Williams, the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury and Master of Magdalene College at Cambridge University, to discuss the nature of theological education. For Williams, Christian education and formation are like “learning to camp in a new land, a new creation.”

  • Looking for a little humor after all those heavy reading topics? Check out “Church is Gross,” a guest post on Experimental Theology from Kevin Makins author of the new book Why Would Anyone Go to Church?  Makins readily admits “there is a certain irony in releasing a book about going to church during the only time in human history when literally no one is allowed to go to church.” But trust me, he makes it work and will have you laughing as he tells you how!

Let’s end in a word of prayer…

O merciful Creator, your hand is open wide to satisfy the needs of every living creature: Make us always thankful for your loving providence; and grant that we, remembering the account that we must one day give, may be faithful stewards of your good gifts; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. (Book of Common Prayer)

Psalm 130

Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord.
Lord, hear my voice!
Let your ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplications!

If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities,
    Lord, who could stand?
But there is forgiveness with you,
    so that you may be revered.

I wait for the Lord, my soul waits,
    and in his word I hope;
my soul waits for the Lord
    more than those who watch for the morning,
    more than those who watch for the morning.

O Israel, hope in the Lord!
    For with the Lord there is steadfast love,
    and with him is great power to redeem.
It is he who will redeem Israel
    from all its iniquities.

 

Almighty and everlasting God, whose will it is to restore all things in your well-beloved Son, the King of kings and Lord of lords: Mercifully grant that the peoples of the earth, divided and enslaved by sin, may be freed and brought together under his most gracious rule; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. (Book of Common Prayer)

Immanuel

God is with us.

I ask that you meditate on that one thought today. Take refuge in it. No matter where you are or what your circumstance, God is present. You are not alone.

“To recognize that the Psalms call us to pray and sing at the intersections of the times — of our time and God’s time, of the then, and the now, and the not yet — is to understand how those emotions are to be held within the rhythm of a life lived in God’s presence.” (N.T. Wright, The Case For The Psalms)

Psalm 23

The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.
2 He makes me lie down in green pastures;
     he leads me beside still waters;
  he restores my soul.
   He leads me in right paths
     for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley,
     I fear no evil;
  for you are with me;
     your rod and your staff—
     they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me
     in the presence of my enemies;
   you anoint my head with oil;
     my cup overflows.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
     all the days of my life,
   and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
     my whole life long.

 

prayinghands-300x209Our heavenly Father, in whom we live and move and have our being: We humbly pray thee so to guide and govern us by thy Holy Spirit, that in all the cares and occupations of our life we may not forget thee, but may remember that we are ever walking in thy sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.  (Book of Common Prayer)

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all. (2 Cor. 13:14)

 

In Prayer

This is another day, O Lord.

I know not what it will bring forth,

but make me ready, Lord, for whatever it may be.

If I am to stand up, help me to stand bravely.

If I am to sit still, help me to sit quietly.

If I am to lie low, help me to do it patiently.

And if I am to do nothing, let me do it gallantly.

Make these words more than words,

and give me the Spirit of Jesus.  Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer)

Thanks Giving

From The Book of Common Prayer:

O Lord, accept our thanks and praise for all that you have done for us. We thank you for the splendor of the whole creation, for the beauty of this world, for the wonder of life, and for the mystery of love.

We thank you for the blessing of family and friends, and for the loving care which surrounds us on every side.

We thank you for setting us at tasks which demand our best efforts, and for leading us to accomplishments which satisfy and delight us.

We thank you also for those disappointments and failures that lead us to acknowledge our dependence on you alone.

Above all, we thank you for your Son Jesus Christ; for the truth of his Word and the example of his life; for his steadfast obedience, by which he overcame temptation; for his dying, through which he overcame death; and for his rising to life again, in which we are raised to the life of your kingdom.

Grant us the gift of your Spirit, that we may know him and make him known; and through him, at all times and in all places, may give thanks to you in all things. Amen.